Eyes of the Great Depression 018

Eyes of the Great Depression 018
Twelve year old son of a cotton sharecropper near Cleveland, Mississippi

Eyes of the Great Depression 018

1937 June.

photographer: Dorothea Lange

Part of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Photograph Collection

Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 USA

hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8b32066


Eyes of the Great Depression 018 – March 17, 2009, exit78.com

american history, economy, eyes of the great depression, great depression, history, people, vintage photos
5 comments… add one
  • Dot Mar 17, 2009

    I'm really enjoying (well, that's not the right word for it) this series. They all look so much older than they are. It must have been incredibly traumatic.

    <abbr>Dot’s last blog post..Impatient to Learn</abbr>

  • teeni Mar 17, 2009

    He is so serious and too cute. I just want to rescue all these people from whatever circumstances they are dealing with. But then again, I wonder if they actually fared better than we will in this day and age. The future is pretty scary right now.

    <abbr>teeni’s last blog post..Better Late Than Never – The Good Will Pill Pattern!</abbr>

  • Patricia Mar 18, 2009

    The teacher from across the street popped in to pick up his mail while I was looking at this post. He said looks like the two homeless kids in my classroom – they still have more hope at age 9!

    Very interesting series. Thank you for the posts

    <abbr>Patricia’s last blog post..Announcing a Writing Contest – With a Financial Incentive!</abbr>

  • Mike Mar 27, 2009

    Dot – I think it's all relative to what their experiences were. What would be very traumatic to us today might not have been back then.

    teeni – I agree. There are some scary paths that we could end up going down.

    Patricia – Interesting contribution in your comment. Some of the "tent cities" I've been seeing on the news reminds me of some of the pictures of migrant camps, Hoovervilles and other homeless camps of the 30s.

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