Cities of the Dead

21st Century Digital #31

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Cities of the Dead Cemetery tombs, New Orleans, Louisiana. 2007.

Cities of the Dead Cemetery tombs, New Orleans, Louisiana. 2007.

The above-ground tombs in New Orleans cemeteries are often referred to as “cities of the dead.” Enter the cemetery gates, and you will be greeted by rusty decorative ironwork and blinded by sun-bleached tombs. Crosses and statues jutting from tomb surfaces cast contrasting shadows, adding to the sense of mystery. Votive candles line tombs on holidays, reminding you that the dead have living relatives who still care.

New Orleans has always respected its dead, but this isn’t the reason that our departed loved ones are interred above ground. Early settlers in the area struggled with different methods to bury the dead. Burial plots are shallow in New Orleans because the water table is very high. Dig a few feet down, and the grave becomes soggy, filling with water. The casket will literally float. You just can’t keep a good person down! The early settlers tried placing stones in and on top of coffins to weigh them down and keep them underground. Unfortunately, after a rainstorm, the rising water table would literally pop the airtight coffins out of the ground. To this day, unpredictable flooding still lifts the occasional coffin out of the ground in areas above the water table, generally considered safe from flooding. (Experience New Orleans)

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/2010630059/. (Accessed March 06, 2017.)

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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21st century digital, landscape, louisiana, parks, photography

Atomic Reactor Makes Electricity

Popular Mechanics, March 1952

Making history are these four bulbs as they glow with the first electricity ever produced by atomic energy. (Experimental Breeder Reactor I)

Making history are these four bulbs as they glow with the first electricity ever produced by atomic energy. (Experimental Breeder Reactor I)

Atomic Reactor Makes Electricity; Popular Mechanics, March 1952For the first time in history, useful amounts of electricity have been produced with atomic energy. The Atomic Energy Commission announced that although the power generated was only 100 kilo-watts and the project was entirely experimental, the result is another milestone in the atomic age. Heat energy was removed from an experimental breeder reactor by a liquid metal of a type not revealed. Sufficient heat was transferred to generate steam for driving the turbine and generator. Power generation is an incidental part of the breeder-reactor experiments being conducted near Idaho Falls, Idaho, but it is providing data about the handling of liquid metals under radioactive conditions. The principal function of the breeder reactor is to convert nonfissionable material into fissionable material more rapidly than the nuclear fuel is consumed, a process that would contribute to expansion of our atomic program. It can never be used to generate large amounts of power, but it is providing information that will be valuable in designing atomic power plants of the future, say scientists at the Idaho laboratory.

Heat from the atomic breeder reactor made the steam that spun the turbine and generator shown above.

Heat from the atomic breeder reactor made the steam that spun the turbine and generator shown above.

Scientists and technicians recorded their feat on the power-plant wall (Experimental Breeder Reactor I)

Scientists and technicians recorded their feat on the power-plant wall.


Today, Experimental Breeder Reactor 1 (EBR1) is decommissioned and has been designated as a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Located about 18 miles southeast of Arco, Idaho.  At 1:50 PM, December 20, 1951, it initially produced sufficient electricity to illuminate four 200-watt light bulbs.  I took the photos below during a 2010 visit to the site:

 At 1:50 PM, December 20, 1951, Experimental Breeder Reactor 1 (EBR!) produced sufficient electricity to illuminate four 200-watt light bulbs.

EBR-I subsequently generated sufficient electricity to power its building, and continued to be used for experimental purposes until it was decommissioned in 1964. (Wikipedia)

EBR-I subsequently generated sufficient electricity to power its building, and continued to be used for experimental purposes until it was decommissioned in 1964.

Electricity was first generated here on Dec. 20, 1951. On Dec. 21, 1951 ~ all of the electrical power in this building was supplied from Atomic Energy.

2 comments
american history, energy, history, idaho, museum, now that’s cool!, nuclear energy, photography, science, science and nature, technology, vintage article, vintage images

Grain Elevator

21st Century Digital #30

Grain elevator, Idaho. 2005.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630913/. (Accessed March 06, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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21st century digital, idaho, landscape, photography, summer

Covered Wagon Ferry Restored in Wyoming

"Covered Wagon Ferry Restored in Wyoming" | article from Popular Science, June 1950from Popular Mechanics, June 1950

Increasing traffic in 1927 forced abandonment of Menor’s Ferry, for 35 years the only connection between the east and west sides at Jackson Hole, Wyo. Instead, a steel bridge was built near by over the Snake River. After 22 years of inactivity. the ferry has been restored by Rockefeller interests. The replica was achieved by examining old photographs and original remnants of the rotting ferry gear. New visitors to this ferry at Moose, Wyo. may ride across a real piece of the old West.

Carrying this old Conestoga wagon and team of horses, the ferry makes its initial trip across the Snake River after the restoration.

Carrying this old Conestoga wagon and team of horses, the ferry makes its initial trip across the Snake River after the restoration.

Menor's ferry - The current is the ferry's "motor."

Menor’s Ferry – the current is the ferry’s “motor.”

Menor's Ferry - A winch changes the angle of the boat in the current and, thus, its direction of travel.

A winch changes the angle of the boat in the current and, thus, its direction of travel.


Additional images and information:

An early photo of Menor's Ferry in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, from the days before the river was bridged.

An early photo of Menor’s Ferry in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Note the covered wagons on the left.

Another early ferry photo from before the river was bridged. Note the early 20th century auto on the ferry and the dirt road on the far side leading from the ferry landing.

Another early ferry photo from before the river was bridged.  Note the early 20th century auto on the ferry and the dirt road on the far side leading from the ferry landing.

Menor’s Ferry after 1950 restoration carrying covered wagon and team of horses across Snake River.

Menor’s Ferry after restoration completion in 1950 carrying covered wagon and team of horses across Snake River.

The current Grand Teton National Park ferry, operated seasonally by National Park Service interpretive rangers and able to carry up to 20 passengers, was built in 1999.  The photos below are from a ride we took on it in July 2010.

National Park Service interpretive ranger operating Menor's Ferry, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

National Park Service interpretive ranger operating Menor’s Ferry, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

On board Menor’s Ferry, looking across the Snake River towards Bill Menor’s cabin and store, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

On board Menor’s Ferry, looking across the Snake River towards Bill Menor’s cabin and store.


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american history, history, landscape, museum, parks, photography, places, river, stream, vintage article, wyoming

Katrina

21st Century Digital #29

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Only steps left after 2005 Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi coast, Mississippi, 2006. March 3.

Only steps left after 2005 Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi coast, Mississippi, 2006. March 3.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630054/. (Accessed March 07, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

2 comments
21st century digital, disaster images, history, landscape, mississippi, photography

Lincoln Statue

21st Century Digital #28

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln and his horse at the Lincoln Summer Home located on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in northwest Washington, D.C. 2008.

Bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln and his horse at the Lincoln Summer Home located on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in northwest Washington, D.C. 2008.

The sculptors are Stuart Williamson and Jiwoong Cheh; working for the design shop StudioIES in Brooklyn; New York. The statue differs from so many others of Abe in that this one actually shows him with a slight smile; as if Lincoln is greeting a valued friend or relative upon arrival at his summer home.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630142/. (Accessed March 07, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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21st century digital, history, museum, photography, washington dc

Seward Highway

21st Century Digital #27

Scenic Seward Highway in the Chugach National Forest, Alaska. Chugach Mountains 2008. August 6.

Seward Highway showcases the natural beauty of south central Alaska between Anchorage and Seward. From jagged peaks and alpine meadows to breathtaking fjords and crystal lakes, find a concentrated series of diverse landscapes and experiences.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630954/ (Accessed March 11, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

0 comments
21st century digital, alaska, forests, landscape, mountains, photography

Antique trucks

21st Century Digital #26

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Antique trucks and cars along the road, Montana. 2005.

Antique trucks and cars along the road, Montana. 2005.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630871/. (Accessed March 06, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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21st century digital, landscape, montana, photography, summer, transportation

Ruth Glacier

21st Century Digital #25

Ruth Glacier, Denali National Park, Alaska. Alaska 2008. August 6.

Ruth Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its upper reaches are almost three vertical miles (4.8 km) below the summit of Denali. The glacier’s “Great Gorge” is one mile (1.6 km) wide, and drops almost 2,000 feet (610 m) over ten miles (16 km), with crevasses along the surface. Above the surface on both sides are 5,000-foot (1,500-m) granite cliffs. From the top of the cliffs to the bottom of the glacier is a height exceeding that of the Grand Canyon. Ruth Glacier moves at a rate of 3.3 feet (1 m) a day and was measured to be 3,800 feet (1,200 m) thick in 1983.

Surrounding the Ruth Gorge are many mountains of the Alaska Range, including the Mooses Tooth, with highly technical ice and rock climbs on their faces. (Wikipedia)

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/2010630826/. (Accessed March 06, 2017.)

Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

0 comments
21st century digital, alaska, landscape, mountains, now that’s cool!, parks, photography, summer

No Selfie Sticks

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign #21 |

Danger! No Selfie Sticks on the platform sign at a Japan Rail station

Danger! No Selfie Sticks on the platform sign at a Japan Rail station
Use of “selfie sticks” is prohibited on the platform!

By Alexander Klink (Own work) [CC BY 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Accessed March 2017

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

0 comments
photography, safety, sign sign everywhere a sign