Lewistown, Chokecherries and “What the Hay!”

September 2007
Music: “When it Rains” by Anna Coogan and North19 track
added using YouTube AudioSwap

While in Montana in September 2007, we had plans to stop in Lewistown to get set up with a satellite internet system. The installer, Ron, had an extra RV spot at his home for friends, complete with hookups and invited us to stay there for a few days. The satellite system was a new model and there were a few wrinkles in getting it set up right. Ron was a member of an on-line RV forum I participated in. Retired, Ron did satellite system installs for other forum members at one price no matter how long it took. While there, we shared supper with Ron and his wife several times in their house and once at the Black Bull Saloon and Steakhouse in Hobson. We also took in the 2007 Lewistown Chokecherry Festival and the What the Hay “hay art” contest that stretched over 21 miles in Judith Basin County between the towns of Hobson and Windham. As, well they took us on a couple of other drives out into the Montana countryside. “What the Hay” is now also called the “Montana Bale Trail.”

__________

Lewistown, Chokecherry Festival, and Montana Bale Trail information:

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autumn, critters, festival, landscape, montana, on the road, photography, places, plains, towns, video, wild life

Shuttlecocks

21st Century Digital #20

Nelson Atkins Art Museum, Kansas City, Missouri.2009. May 7.

Claes Oldenburg, American (b. Sweden, 1929), Coosje van Bruggen, American (b. The Netherlands, 1942-2009). Shuttlecocks, 1994. Aluminum, fiberglass-reinforced plastic, paint, h x diam: 19 feet 2 9/16 inches x 15 feet 11 7/8 inches. Purchase: acquired through the generosity of the Sosland Family, F94-1/1-4. Donald J. Hall Sculpture Park. (The Nelson Atkins Museum of Art)

A shuttlecock (also called a bird or birdie) is a high-drag projectile used in the sport of badminton. The name is from the Victorian times, when Badminton was first discovered and became popular. It has an open conical shape: the cone is formed from 16 or so overlapping feathers, usually goose or duck, embedded into a rounded cork base. The cork is covered with thin leather. To ensure that shuttlecocks rotate consistently, only feathers from the birds’ left wings are used. The shuttlecock’s shape makes it extremely aerodynamically stable. Regardless of initial orientation, it will turn to fly cork first, and remain in the cork-first orientation. The name ‘shuttlecock’ is frequently shortened to shuttle. The “shuttle” part of the name was probably derived from its back-and-forth motion during the game, resembling the shuttle of a loom; the “cock” part of the name was probably derived from the resemblance of the feathers to those on a cockerel. (Wikipedia)

Highsmith, Carol M, photographer. Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630148/. (Accessed March 03, 2017.)

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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21st century digital, art, landscape, missouri, museum, photography, sculpture

Signs of the Times

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign #16 |

Signs of the Times -- An elaborate painted sign, of four completed in three days in 2015 by "lettermen," as artistic sign painters call themselves, who met for a convention in Cincinnati, Ohio, and stopped by the American Sign Museum in the industrial Camp Washington neighborhood to see the museum and demonstrate their trade.

A mural in Cincinnati that depicts a sign painter in action using “distressed” techniques in which the painter creates the illusion of an old and faded sign, but all at once from scratch on a brand new sign.

Photograph by Carol M. Highsmith, October 18, 2016

An elaborate painted sign, of four completed in three days in 2015 by “lettermen,” as artistic sign painters call themselves, who met for a convention in Cincinnati, Ohio, and stopped by the American Sign Museum in the industrial Camp Washington neighborhood to see the museum and demonstrate their trade. Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, United States, 2016. -10-18. Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2016632971/. (Accessed April 02, 2017.)

Credit line: Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
Purchase; Carol M. Highsmith Photography, Inc.; 2016; (DLC/PP-2016:103-4).
Forms part of the Carol M. Highsmith Archive.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

1 comment
art, ohio, photography, sign sign everywhere a sign

Scotts Bluff National Monument

Three from the Road #21 – 2010 trip1 |

Eagle Rock at Scotts Bluff National Monument, July 9, 2010

Eagle Rock at Scotts Bluff National Monument, July 9, 2010

Long serving as a landmark for travelers from native peoples to those following the Oregon, California, and Mormon emigrant trails, Scotts Bluff towers 800 feet above the North Platte River. The trails’ route past Scotts Bluff was through Mitchell Pass, a gap through the Scotts Bluff formations, between Eagle Rock and Sentinel Rock. After 1851, this route replaced Robidoux Pass, eliminating an 8 mile swing south.

Travel over the trails continued unabated in the early 1860s, even after the onset of the American Civil War, until early August 1864, when an Indian war erupted that pitted volunteer soldiers against Sioux, Arapaho, and Southern Cheyenne warriors. For several weeks, all traffic and communications on the trails were stopped.  While several military expeditions sought the warring tribes, they failed to bring them into battle. In response, Brigadier General Robert Mitchell established a plan to to fortify each stage station along the Oregon Trail, with troops detailed to them for their defense.  Mitchell also decided to establish two forts at strategic points. One, defending the branch road to Denver, was established near Julesburg, Colorado.  The second, which came to bear the general’s name, was a sod stockade structure established northwest of Scotts Bluff.  The ground plan of Fort Mitchell consisted of a stockade with a sally port, firing loopholes, and a sentinel tower.2

Official records documenting Fort Mitchell’s history are meager, but construction had begun by September 1, 1864, the date General Mitchell visited the site. The general’s aide-de-camp noted that the men of the 11th Ohio’s Company F were hard at work building the sod structure. Captain Jacob Shuman, the first commander of the as yet unnamed post, gave General Mitchell a tour of the site and described his plans for a sod stockade he hoped to have finished before winter set in. By the end of October, most of the work had been completed and the post was named for the general who had ordered its construction.

Although no physical indications of the post remain, nearby Mitchell Pass preserves the name and serves as a reminder that for three years, Fort Mitchell stood guard along the Oregon Trail during an important period in American history.3

Trail rut remnants in Mitchell Pass, Scotts Bluff National Monument, Nebraska, July 9, 2010

Trail rut remnants in Mitchell Pass, Scotts Bluff National Monument, Nebraska, July 9, 2010

Eagle Rock above Park Buildings, Scotts Bluff National Monument, Nebraska, July 9, 2010

Eagle Rock above Park Buildings, Scotts Bluff National Monument, Nebraska, July 9, 2010


Endnotes

    1. Three from the Road is a series sharing images from places we’ve visited.  Initially, each post included thee images, related by a randomly selected location or topic. Posts now may be random choices or pre-planned sequences.  This post is in a series sequentially sharing images from our 2010 trip west.
    2. Wikipedia
    3. Fort Mitchell – National Park Service
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3 from the road, american history, civil war, landscape, nebraska, parks, photography, places, summer, travel, Travel Photos

A Trip West – 2007

Selected photos from a trip in the western U.S. in 2007.  Audio track: Paul Mottram’s “Sidewalk Saunter.”

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america, arkansas, hiking, kansas, lake, landscape, montana, mountains, nebraska, new mexico, oklahoma, on the road, parks, photography, places, plains, river, south dakota, stream, summer, thermal features, towns, travel, utah, video, wild life, wyoming

Black Sand Beach

21st Century Digital #19

Punalu’u Black Sand Beach on the Big Island, Hawaii. 2005. December 6.

Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/2010630043/. (Accessed March 05, 2017.)

Photograph: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

See on Flickr

Punalu’u Beach (Wikipedia)

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21st century digital, hawaii, landscape, photography, places, volcano

Strike

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign #15

New York City employees picket City Hall
1954 World Telegram photo by Dick DeMarsico.

Teamster Union members holding picket signs supporting higher raises and pensions.

Photograph retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/00652480/. (Accessed April 02, 2017.)

Forms part of: New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection (Library of Congress).

See my Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign video on YouTube!

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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life, new york, people, photography, places, sign sign everywhere a sign, urban, vintage image, vintage photos

A Visit to Great Falls, Montana

While we had been here before, in 2001, we had just been passing through on our way to Glacier National Park and had made reservations at a hotel in Great Falls for one night.

In the images used for this video, though, Great Falls was a 2007 destination for a family visit. A brother, his wife and two sons were living there. While visiting with family, we also saw some of what is left of the falls, went to a farmers’ market, saw an autocross competition, visited Giant Spring State Park, spent a little time at a horse auction and stopped at the Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail Interpretive Center.

__________

References for Great Falls:

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family, landscape, montana, parks, photography, places, river, stream, summer, towns, travel, video

Thank You Sid

21st Century Digital #18

Jimmy Stewart’s hand and footprints, Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, Los Angeles, California. 2006. July 3.

The grand opening of Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood on May 18, 1927, was the most spectacular theatre opening in motion picture history. Thousands of people lined Hollywood Boulevard and a riot broke out as fans tried to catch a glimpse of the movie stars and other celebrities as they arrived for the opening. The film being premiered that night was Cecil B. DeMille’s The King of Kings,’ which was preceded by “Glories of the Scriptures,” a live prologue devised by master showman Sid Grauman. A Wurlitzer organ and 65-piece orchestra provided music for the prologue. The theatre opened to the public the following day, May 19, 1927. Protected by its 40-foot high curved walls and copper- topped turrets, the theatre’s legendary forecourt serves as an oasis to the stars of yesterday and today. Ten-foot tall lotus-shaped fountains and intricate artistry flank the footprints of some of Hollywood’s most elite and welcome its visitors into the magical world of fantasy and whim known as Hollywood. (Library of Congress)

Photographer: Carol M. Highsmith

Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color.

Retrieved from the Library of Congress, http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010630039/. (Accessed March 02, 2017.)

See more on Flickr.

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1000 words, america, california, history, people, photography

The Hollywood Sign

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign #14

The Hollywood Sign as it appears from a trail in the Hollywood Hills in Hollywood, California
November 5th, 2006

Wikipedia: The Hollywood Sign (formerly the Hollywoodland Sign) is a landmark and American cultural icon located in Los Angeles, California. It is situated on Mount Lee, in the Hollywood Hills area of the Santa Monica Mountains. The sign overlooks Hollywood, Los Angeles.

“HOLLYWOOD” is spelled out in 45-foot (13.7 m)-tall white capital letters and is 350 feet (106.7 m) long. It was originally created in 1923 as an advertisement for a local real estate development, but it garnered increasing recognition after the sign was left up.[2] The sign was a frequent target of pranks and vandalism, but it has since undergone restoration, including the installation of a security system to deter vandalism. The sign is protected and promoted by The Trust For Public Land, a nonprofit organization, while its site and the surrounding land are part of Griffith Park.

From the ground, the contours of the hills give the sign a wavy appearance. When observed at a comparable altitude, the letters appear nearly level.

The sign makes frequent appearances in popular culture, particularly in establishing shots for films and television programs set in or around Hollywood. Signs of similar style, but spelling different words, are frequently seen as parodies. (See more at Wikipedia)

Photo by Oreos (Own work) [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons 5 November 2006

Accessed March 2017

See my Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign video on YouTube!

Note – This image has been digitally adjusted for one or more of the following:
– fade correction,
– color, contrast, and/or saturation enhancement
– selected spot and/or scratch removal
– cropped for composition and/or to accentuate subject matter
– straighten image

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california, mountains, photography, places, sign sign everywhere a sign, towns, travel