Garden Pavilion

Garden Pavilion at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, Charlottesville, Virginia, May 8, 2009

Garden Pavilion at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, Charlottesville, Virginia, May 8, 2009

Monticello Vegetable Garden | Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello

The vegetable garden evolved over many years, beginning in 1770 when crops were first cultivated along the contours of the slope. Terracing was introduced in 1806, and by 1812, gardening activity was at its peak. The 1,000-foot-long terrace, or garden plateau, was literally hewed from the side of the mountain with slave labor, and it was supported by a massive stone wall that stood over twelve feet in its highest section. One contemporary visitor remarked on the dramatic “sea view” across the rolling Piedmont countryside.

Perched atop the wall, at the half-way point of the garden, is the garden pavilion with its double-sash windows, Chinese railing, and pyramidal roof. The pavilion was used by Jefferson as a quiet retreat where he could read in the evening. It was reputedly blown down in a violent wind storm in the late 1820’s. The pavilion was reconstructed in 1984 based on Jefferson’s notes and archaeological excavations. It overlooks an eight-acre orchard of 300 trees, a vineyard, and Monticello’s berry squares, which are plots of figs, currants, gooseberries, and raspberries.

american history, food, gardens, history, landscape, parks, photography, places, spring, virginia

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  • Jake Jan 27, 2016

    The place looks beautiful!

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